Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only)

Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only) Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only) Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only) Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only) Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only) Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only)
Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only) Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only) Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only) Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only) Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only)

The Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera is an outstanding still photography option, an extremely well-suited 4K-capable video tool and a photography workhorse that continues the legacy that Canon has set with their EOS 5D range. This multimedia maven offers a newly developed 30.4 megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor paired with the DIGIC 6+ image processor in order to balance fine detail and resolution with low-light performance and sensitivity. It is able to work within a native range of ISO 100-32000, which can then be expanded to an impressive ISO 50-102400, for sharp, low-noise images in a variety of conditions. Along with these improvements to image quality, users will enjoy a performance boost across the board with an enhanced AF system, built-in Wi-Fi, NFC, and GPS and much more.

  • Canon
  • 1483C004AA
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The Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera is an outstanding still photography option, an extremely well-suited 4K-capable video tool and a photography workhorse that continues the legacy that Canon has set with their EOS 5D range. This multimedia maven offers a newly developed 30.4 megapixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. full-frame CMOS sensor paired with the DIGIC 6+ image processor in order to balance fine detail and resolution with low-light performance and sensitivity. It is able to work within a native range of ISOISOExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. The ISO speed determines how sensitive a camera's sensor is to incoming light. A higher ISO speed absorbs more light, resulting in a brighter exposure, however, a higher ISO also results in more digital noise in low-light conditions. Cameras with larger sensors (like full-frame cameras) typically have higher ISO speed capability and produce less digital noise at high ISO settings. Digital cameras include a control for adjusting ISO speed, some of which can be set to adjust automatically in combination with certain other exposure settings. ISO is indicated in numbers usually starting at 100 and going upward (200, 400, 800, 1600 etc.) doubling in sensitivity each time. Most cameras also indicate 3rd stop intervals (100, 125, 180, 200 etc.) 100-32000, which can then be expanded to an impressive ISOISOExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. The ISO speed determines how sensitive a camera's sensor is to incoming light. A higher ISO speed absorbs more light, resulting in a brighter exposure, however, a higher ISO also results in more digital noise in low-light conditions. Cameras with larger sensors (like full-frame cameras) typically have higher ISO speed capability and produce less digital noise at high ISO settings. Digital cameras include a control for adjusting ISO speed, some of which can be set to adjust automatically in combination with certain other exposure settings. ISO is indicated in numbers usually starting at 100 and going upward (200, 400, 800, 1600 etc.) doubling in sensitivity each time. Most cameras also indicate 3rd stop intervals (100, 125, 180, 200 etc.) 50-102400, for sharp, low-noiseNOISEThe appearance of random pixels scattered over a photo, similar to the grain effect seen in film photography, which degrades photo quality almost as if it is stained. It occurs when taking photos in low-light conditions, with very slow shutter speeds on high sensitivity (ISO) settings. It is caused by amplification done by the sensor when high ISO settings are used. You can counteract digital noise by lowering the sensitivity (ISO) setting of your camera - the lower the ISO setting, the lower the noise in the image. Typically cameras with larger sensors (like full-frame cameras) will inherently produce less noise due to larger pixels on the sensor. images in a variety of conditions. Along with these improvements to image quality, users will enjoy a performance boost across the board with an enhanced AF system, built-in Wi-Fi, NFC, and GPS, and much more.

In order to deliver detailed images quickly and effectively, the Canon 5D Mark IV leverages the power of the DIGIC 6+ image processor, which can handle up to 7 fps during continuous shooting. It also uses a 150,000-pixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. RGB+IR metering sensor to evaluate the scene and subjects for accurate exposureEXPOSUREExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. Achieving the correct exposure is similar to collecting rain in a bucket, up to an optimum level. The rate of rainfall is out of your control (light), yet you can control these three factors: the bucket’s width (lens aperture), the duration you leave it in the rain (shutter speed), and how effective your bucket is in collecting rain (ISO). These three elements work together to control the amount of light per unit area, preventing underexposure (too dark) or overexposure (too bright), giving you a natural looking image.s under a variety of different lighting conditions. An improved 61-point High Density Reticular AF furthers the camera's speed by tracking and locking onto subjects quickly and accurately for tack sharp photos. A new AF area select button is now available as well for near immediate access to this setting.

Video benefits from the addition of Dual PixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. CMOS AF and Movie Servo AF to smoothly rack focus during a shot. Shooters can even make use of the 3.2" 1.62m-dot touchscreen LCD to simply tap to adjust the focus point. Furthermore, now that the camera has DCI 4K (4096 x 2160) video recording at up to 30 fps, users can snag 8.8MP stills from the video for an even faster capture option. Tied into the Dual PixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. sensor architecture is a brand new feature for Canon: Dual PixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. RAW, which allows for fine tuning of certain image parameters, including bokehBOKEHPronounced: /ˈboʊkɛ/, /ˈboʊkeɪ/ [boh-kay] or /ˈboʊkə/ [boh-kə] Originating from the Japanese word Boke (ボケ), meaning 'blur' or 'haze', it refers to the aesthetic quality of the blur produced in the out-of-focus parts of an image produced by a lens. It has also been defined as the way the lens renders out-of-focus points of light. Bokeh depends on various aspects of lens design. Aperture design has the largest effect on Bokeh, and generally a lens with a more rounded aperture produces a more pleasing, natural Bokeh. shift and focus micro adjustment, after the image is taken.

The body has been further refined for comfort and ease of access, as well as durability and weather resistance. The Canon N3 remote port has been relocated to the front of the camera body and they have added both GPS and Wi-Fi with NFC to make this model a connected camera.


30.4 MegapixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. Full-Frame CMOS Sensor and DIGIC 6+ Image Processor

In line with previous members of the main 5D series, the Mark IV attempts to balance high resolution with low-light performance with a newly developed 30.4MP full-frame CMOS sensor. This provides a beneficial increase in overall resolution without compromising on sensitivity. Additionally, thanks to the DIGIC 6+ image processor it is paired with, it offers impressive performance within a native range of ISOISOExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. The ISO speed determines how sensitive a camera's sensor is to incoming light. A higher ISO speed absorbs more light, resulting in a brighter exposure, however, a higher ISO also results in more digital noise in low-light conditions. Cameras with larger sensors (like full-frame cameras) typically have higher ISO speed capability and produce less digital noise at high ISO settings. Digital cameras include a control for adjusting ISO speed, some of which can be set to adjust automatically in combination with certain other exposure settings. ISO is indicated in numbers usually starting at 100 and going upward (200, 400, 800, 1600 etc.) doubling in sensitivity each time. Most cameras also indicate 3rd stop intervals (100, 125, 180, 200 etc.) 100-32000, which can be expanded to ISOISOExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. The ISO speed determines how sensitive a camera's sensor is to incoming light. A higher ISO speed absorbs more light, resulting in a brighter exposure, however, a higher ISO also results in more digital noise in low-light conditions. Cameras with larger sensors (like full-frame cameras) typically have higher ISO speed capability and produce less digital noise at high ISO settings. Digital cameras include a control for adjusting ISO speed, some of which can be set to adjust automatically in combination with certain other exposure settings. ISO is indicated in numbers usually starting at 100 and going upward (200, 400, 800, 1600 etc.) doubling in sensitivity each time. Most cameras also indicate 3rd stop intervals (100, 125, 180, 200 etc.) 50-102400. 

Versatility is key with the 5D, as it needs to be able to tackle landscapes and weddings with equal ease. By using a 150,000-pixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. RGB+IR metering sensor shooters will be able to more comfortably rely on the camera to capture difficult scenes. This sensor also has face detection as well as flicker detection which can ensure proper exposureEXPOSUREExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. Achieving the correct exposure is similar to collecting rain in a bucket, up to an optimum level. The rate of rainfall is out of your control (light), yet you can control these three factors: the bucket’s width (lens aperture), the duration you leave it in the rain (shutter speed), and how effective your bucket is in collecting rain (ISO). These three elements work together to control the amount of light per unit area, preventing underexposure (too dark) or overexposure (too bright), giving you a natural looking image. in less-than-ideal lighting situations. Along with this, the camera offers an improved continuous shooting rate of 7 fps, making it a great option for events and action.


150,000-PixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. RGB+IR Metering Sensor Helps Provide Precise ExposureEXPOSUREExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. Achieving the correct exposure is similar to collecting rain in a bucket, up to an optimum level. The rate of rainfall is out of your control (light), yet you can control these three factors: the bucket’s width (lens aperture), the duration you leave it in the rain (shutter speed), and how effective your bucket is in collecting rain (ISO). These three elements work together to control the amount of light per unit area, preventing underexposure (too dark) or overexposure (too bright), giving you a natural looking image. Metering

To help deliver nearly fool-proof performance, the EOS 5D Mark IV camera employs a powerful and instant subject and light analysis system. The iSA Intelligent Scene Analysis system uses its own RGB+IR light sensor with an approximately 150,000-pixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. resolution to provide the camera with immense image analysis in an instant, making necessary corrections along the way. The sensor enables Canon’s anti-flicker function, which detects the frequency and phase of a light source’s flicker (such as a fluorescent light) and captures images near the point of peak brightness when the subject is most likely to be well-illuminated. The EOS 5D Mark IV also incorporates Canon’s Intelligent Tracking and Recognition system (iTR AF) that detects and tracks subjects, automatically switching the AF point to optimise tracking. Using tracking algorithms tailored to recognise faces and colours, this system not only helps to quickly and automatically select the ideal capture settings, but also serves as a brilliant foundation to the EOS 5D Mark IV’s AF system.


High Density Reticular AF and Dual PixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. CMOS AF Systems

Ensuring your subject is tack sharp, the 5D Mark IV incorporates an enhanced High Density Reticular AF system, which offers 61 phase-detect points, with all points sensitive to f/8 and 41 of which are cross-type. The center point can function down to -3 EV for working in extremely dim lighting. Compared to previous versions, this sensor has expanded vertical coverage of 24% on the peripherals and 8% in the center in order to better track and locate subjects in the frame. 

In addition to advanced tracking and focusing while using the optical finder for stills, Live View and video can now use Dual PixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. CMOS AF on the actual imaging sensor. This offers about 80% coverage of phase-detection autofocus for faster and more accurate focusing in these modes. It is ideal for video as users will enjoy smoother rack focusing without the downsides normally encountered with contrastCONTRASTThe difference between areas of different brightness levels in a photograph: A high-contrast image has a greater difference between light and dark areas, whereas a low-contrast image has a narrow range of tones. Contrast is used to direct a viewer’s attention to a photographer’s subject either with colour contrast (bold versus duller colours) or tonal contrast (bright versus darker tones). -based systems. Also, this works well with the touchscreen functions, allowing shooters to just tap to adjust focus.


61 AF Points with Expanded Vertical Coverage with 41 Cross-Type Points

To complement its stellar CMOS sensor and powerful processing abilities, the EOS 5D Mark IV camera incorporates a 61-point High Density Reticular AF II system. It features up to 41 cross-type points and an extensive AF area that extends well into the top and bottom of the peripheral frame. It also has a wide subject tracking area that enhances the AF system with consistent focus tracking to capture the action at hand and includes Canon’s AI Servo AF III, which remembers the AF path and helps refine precision shot-to-shot. Low-light performance is phenomenal – the AF system’s low-intensity limit is EV -3 at the center AF point and all 61 AF points are compatible down to f/8 for excellent low-light performance, even with lens extenders attached. To help ensure that AF points and other shooting information are visible at a glance, the EOS 5D Mark IV also features Canon’s Intelligent Viewfinder II for a bright, customisable view. Whether choosing individual AF points manually or using one of the camera’s automatic AF selection modes, the EOS 5D Mark IV’s AF system is a significant part of its overall excellence.


Excellent performance up to 7.0 fps

The EOS 5D Mark IV camera is designed to keep up with the action. Its remarkable shutter, advanced AF and exposureEXPOSUREExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. Achieving the correct exposure is similar to collecting rain in a bucket, up to an optimum level. The rate of rainfall is out of your control (light), yet you can control these three factors: the bucket’s width (lens aperture), the duration you leave it in the rain (shutter speed), and how effective your bucket is in collecting rain (ISO). These three elements work together to control the amount of light per unit area, preventing underexposure (too dark) or overexposure (too bright), giving you a natural looking image. and image processing systems help ensure virtually instantaneous response and performance at up to 7.0 fps, even at full resolution. Whether searching for a joyous expression on a bride’s face or capturing an athlete in action, the EOS 5D Mark IV doesn’t let file size compromise the speed of capture even when bracketing exposureEXPOSUREExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. Achieving the correct exposure is similar to collecting rain in a bucket, up to an optimum level. The rate of rainfall is out of your control (light), yet you can control these three factors: the bucket’s width (lens aperture), the duration you leave it in the rain (shutter speed), and how effective your bucket is in collecting rain (ISO). These three elements work together to control the amount of light per unit area, preventing underexposure (too dark) or overexposure (too bright), giving you a natural looking image.s of a complex lighting situation, helping photographers and moviemakers attain consistently high performance in many situations.


DCI 4K Video Recording

Designed for both professional stills shooting and video recording, the 5D Mark IV supports DCI 4K (4096 x 2160) resolution recording at up to 30 fps at 500 Mbps, along with Full HD 1080p shooting at 60 fps and HD 720p at 120 fps for slow motion playback. When recording in-camera, 4K video has 4:2:2 sampling and 8-bit color depth, while Full HD 1080p footage has 4:2:0 sampling. Uncompressed Full HD 1080p video can also be saved via HDMI to an optional external recorder with 4:2:2 color sampling. 4K video is recorded using a central 4096 x 2160 area of the sensor at a 1.74x crop in order to record video with an ideal 1:1 pixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. sampling ratio, while Full HD recording makes use of the entire full frame. 

Audio can be recorded using the on-board stereo microphone or an optional external mic can also be used via the 3.5mm mic jack. Real time audio monitoring is possible, too, via the 3.5mm headphone jack. The 4K video recording also avails the ability to take 8.8MP still frame grabs during playback on the rear touchscreen and save them as single images.


Dual PixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. RAW

First implemented here on the 5D Mark IV, Dual PixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. RAW allows photographers to record all the information the sensor's unique pixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. architecture can deliver, providing a way for fine adjustments to be made after the image is taken. These adjustments include focus fine tuning that can help you ever-so-slightly adjust the focus point to bring out extra details, shift bokehBOKEHPronounced: /ˈboʊkɛ/, /ˈboʊkeɪ/ [boh-kay] or /ˈboʊkə/ [boh-kə] Originating from the Japanese word Boke (ボケ), meaning 'blur' or 'haze', it refers to the aesthetic quality of the blur produced in the out-of-focus parts of an image produced by a lens. It has also been defined as the way the lens renders out-of-focus points of light. Bokeh depends on various aspects of lens design. Aperture design has the largest effect on Bokeh, and generally a lens with a more rounded aperture produces a more pleasing, natural Bokeh. around for improved composition, and reduce the impact of ghosting on your photos. This requires the use of Canon's Digital Photo Professional 4.5 software.


3.2" Touch Panel LCD 

The EOS 5D Mark IV camera features a 1.62 million dot, low-reflection 3.2-inch Clear View LCD II monitor for bright, sharp display in a wide variety of shooting situations. The LCD’s touch panel surface facilitates fast, intuitive operation, including AF frame switching, menu and setting changes plus image magnification during Live View shooting and movie shooting. Still photographs can also be captured quickly with the touch panel’s shutter release function. A customisable Quick Control screen adds flexibility and convenience for specific users’ preferences. Image review and playback are also enhanced with the EOS 5D Mark IV camera’s Clear View LCD II Monitor. Not only does the EOS 5D Mark IV’s LCD provide a high-precision image for composition and playback, but it also remains visible even when the photographer is wearing polarised sunglasses! In numerous situations in the studio and in the field, the EOS 5D Mark IV’s LCD panel is an ideal complement to its amazing TTL viewfinder.


Built-in Wi-Fi® Technology 

For a useful and quick workflow in a variety of locations, the EOS 5D Mark IV camera’s built-in Wi-Fi®^ feature can help streamline camera operations across the board. Using the free Canon Camera Connect app^ on a compatible iOS® or Android™ device, the EOS 5D Mark IV can easily be set up to shoot remotely from a distance, even in Live View mode, with complete control of settings such as apertureAPERTUREAperture, shutter speed and ISO form what is known as the exposure triangle in photography. Aperture refers to an opening inside the lens, similar to the iris of your eye, that changes in diameter to control the amount of light that enters a camera. Aperture is expressed in f-stops: the lower the number, the larger the aperture, e.g. f/1.4 is larger than f/8. A larger (or wider) aperture allows more light to pass through the lens to the sensor (film) as a picture is taken, particularly useful in low-light conditions. A larger aperture also produces a shallower depth-of-field, and thus more background blur., shutter speedSHUTTER SPEEDAperture, shutter speed and ISO form what is known as the exposure triangle in photography. Shutter speed is the length of time that a single frame is exposed for, more specifically how fast the shutter opens and closes to permit light entering the lens, to reach the sensor. A slow shutter speed means a longer exposure time useful for motion blur like the silky look of flowing water, whereas a fast shutter speed means a shorter exposure time useful for freezing the appearance of motion in images like a hummingbird in flight. It is measured in seconds starting at 1 second and halving our doubling in time. For example: 1/2s, 1/4s and 1/8s are all fractions of a second with 1/2s being the longest exposure time, 1/4s half of that and 1/8s another half etc., ISOISOExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. The ISO speed determines how sensitive a camera's sensor is to incoming light. A higher ISO speed absorbs more light, resulting in a brighter exposure, however, a higher ISO also results in more digital noise in low-light conditions. Cameras with larger sensors (like full-frame cameras) typically have higher ISO speed capability and produce less digital noise at high ISO settings. Digital cameras include a control for adjusting ISO speed, some of which can be set to adjust automatically in combination with certain other exposure settings. ISO is indicated in numbers usually starting at 100 and going upward (200, 400, 800, 1600 etc.) doubling in sensitivity each time. Most cameras also indicate 3rd stop intervals (100, 125, 180, 200 etc.), focus and shutter release. Image review and transfer are similarly fast and easy without ever having to take the camera out of its bag. Full DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance) compatibility means easy sharing between the EOS 5D Mark IV and other DLNA products, such as HDTVs and compatible smartphones. Still images can even be transferred between two wireless-enabled Canon cameras over a Local Area Network (LAN). Images and video can also be uploaded instantly to CANON iMAGE GATEWAY# for easy sharing on social networking sites, and photos can even be printed on a wireless PictBridge-certified printer without the need for a PC. For more robust Wi-Fi® connections, the EOS 5D Mark IV is also compatible with Canon’s optional Wireless File Transmitter WFT-E7, which supports 2.4GHz/5GHz frequency bands, multiple camera sync and can extend the EOS 5D Mark IV’s operating range up to 10 times that of the camera’s built-in Wi-Fi®.


^ Compatible with iOS® versions 8.0/8.1/8.2/8.3/8.4/9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3, Android™smartphone and tablet versions 4.1/4.2/4.3/4.4/5.0/5.1/6.0. Data charges may apply with the download of the free Canon Camera Connect app. This app helps enable you to upload images to social media services. Please note that image files may contain personally identifiable information that may implicate privacy laws. Canon disclaims and has no responsibility for your use of such images. Canon does not obtain, collect or use such images or any information included in such images through this app.

# One-time registration is required on CANON iMAGE GATEWAY online photo album.


Built-in NFC Technology 

Built-in NFC (Near Field Communication) technology helps provide the EOS 5D Mark IV camera with a virtually seamless connection to compatible Android™ devices^^. Simply tap to connect and transfer images and videos. It’s also compatible with the Canon Connect Station CS100 device, which makes it simple for photographers and moviemakers to view and organise all their photos and videos from one connected device.


^^ Compatible with Android™ smartphone and tablet versions 4.0/4.1/4.2/4.3/4.4/5.0/5.1/6.0.


Built-in GPS Provides Geotag Information

For news photographers capturing hundreds or even thousands of images while moving around throughout the day, landscape photographers on location and even photographers on vacation, GPS has become an indispensable part of a daily workflow. The EOS 5D Mark IV camera’s built-in GPS helps photographers and filmmakers both tag their images with critical location data, and also adjust the time and timestamp on the camera automatically. Featuring both built-in GPS^^^ and Wi-Fi®^ technology, the EOS 5D Mark IV can use GPS and WFT (Wireless File Transfer) together, making it easy to upload numerous images and movies both quickly and from increasingly distant locales. Compatible with American GPS satellites, Russian GLONASS satellites and Japanese quasi-zenith satellites Michibiki, the EOS 5D Mark IV’s GPS information stays reliably accurate in many locations.


^^^ In certain countries and regions, the use of GPS may be restricted. Therefore be sure to use GPS in accordance with the laws and regulations of your country or region. Be particularly careful when traveling outside your home country. As a signal is received from GPS satellites, take sufficient measures when using in locations where the use of electronics is regulated.

^ Compatible with iOS® versions 8.0/8.1/8.2/8.3/8.4/9.0/9.1/9.2/9.3, Android™ smartphone and tablet versions 4.1/4.2/4.3/4.4/5.0/5.1/6.0. Data charges may apply with the download of the free Canon Camera Connect app. This app helps enable you to upload images to social media services. Please note that image files may contain personally identifiable information that may implicate privacy laws. Canon disclaims and has no responsibility for your use of such images. Canon does not obtain, collect or use such images or any information included in such images through this app.


Body Design

  • A dedicated AF mode selection button located beneath the rear joystick offers another avenue for accessing settings, allowing for fast, intuitive access to commonly changed options.
  • Dual CompactFlash and SD memory card slots allow you to extend your file saving capabilities by permitting overflow recording or in-camera file type separation while shooting.
  • An Intelligent Viewfinder II uses a pentaprism design and offers a bright means for viewing. When using the viewfinder, AF points are highlighted in red for greater visibility in low-light conditions, and the finder can also be configured to display a range of other shooting aids, such as an electronic level, grid, flicker detection, white balance, metering mode, AF information, and other settings.
  • A Mirror Vibration Control System helps to minimize mechanical vibrations in order to better ensure sharpness during long exposureEXPOSUREExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. Achieving the correct exposure is similar to collecting rain in a bucket, up to an optimum level. The rate of rainfall is out of your control (light), yet you can control these three factors: the bucket’s width (lens aperture), the duration you leave it in the rain (shutter speed), and how effective your bucket is in collecting rain (ISO). These three elements work together to control the amount of light per unit area, preventing underexposure (too dark) or overexposure (too bright), giving you a natural looking image.s or fast continuous shooting bursts.
  • A robust magnesium alloy body design is both dust- and weather-sealed to permit working in harsh environments.


Other Camera Features

  • Digital Lens Optimiser technology compensates for a range of optical defects from various lenses, including chromatic aberration, distortion, peripheral brightness, and diffraction, and the camera can store lens data in order to avoid having to re-register lenses prior to each use. The camera can handle this process in real time, delivering JPEGs with the corrections already applied.
  • A built-in intervalometer permits the creation of time lapse imagery and supports recording 1-99 consecutive frames in pre-selected intervals from 1 second to 99 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds. Users can also choose to set the camera to unlimited frames.



Camera
Megapixels 30.4 Megapixels
Sensor Size Type Full-Frame
Sensor actual Size 36 x 24 mm
Sensor Type CMOS
Framerate Up to 7 fps at 30 MP for up to 21 frames in raw format
Up to 7 fps at 30 MP for unlimited frames in JPEG format
ISO Range Auto, 100-32000 (Extended Mode: 50-102400)
Focus Points 61 (of which 41 is cross-type)
Lens Mount Canon EF
Memory CompactFlash
SDXC
SDHC
SD
Fastest Shutter Speed 1/8000 sec
Longest Shutter Speed 30 sec, Bulb Mode
Flash Sync Speed 1/200 sec
Processor DIGIC 6+
Video 4K - M-JPEG
4096 x 2160p / 29.97 fps (500 Mbps) / 24 fps (500 Mbps) / 23.98 fps (500 Mbps)
------------------------
High Definition - MOV
1920 x 1080p / 59.94 fps (180 Mbps) / 29.97 fps (90 Mbps) / 24 fps (90 Mbps)
/ 23.98 fps (90 Mbps) / 59.94 fps (60 Mbps) / 29.97 fps (30 Mbps)
/ 24 fps (30 Mbps) / 23.98 fps (30 Mbps)
1280 x 720p / 120 fps (160 Mbps)
------------------------
High Definition - MP4
1920 x 1080p / 59.94 fps (60 Mbps) / 29.97 fps (30 Mbps) / 24 fps (30 Mbps)
/ 23.98 fps (30 Mbps) / 29.97 fps (12 Mbps)
File Formats Still Images: JPEG, RAW
Movies: MJPEG, MOV, MP4, MPEG-4 AVC/H.264
Audio: AAC, Linear PCM (Stereo)
Built-in Flash No
Weather Sealing Professional Grade Weather Sealing

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What's in the box?

  • Canon EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR Camera (Body Only)
  • LP-E6N Lithium-Ion Battery Pack (7.2V, 1865mAh)
  • LC-E6 Charger for LP-E6 Battery Pack
  • Eyecup Eg
  • RF-3 Body Cap for Canon EOS Cameras
  • IFC-150U II USB 3.0 Interface Cable for DSLRs
  • Cable Protector
  • Wide Neck Strap
  • Software CD-ROM

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