Canon EOS 7D Mark II DSLR Camera Kit with 18-135mm IS STM Lens

Canon EOS 7D Mark II DSLR Camera Kit with 18-135mm IS STM Lens Canon EOS 7D Mark II DSLR Camera Kit with 18-135mm IS STM Lens Canon EOS 7D Mark II DSLR Camera Kit with 18-135mm IS STM Lens Canon EOS 7D Mark II DSLR Camera Kit with 18-135mm IS STM Lens
Canon EOS 7D Mark II DSLR Camera Kit with 18-135mm IS STM Lens Canon EOS 7D Mark II DSLR Camera Kit with 18-135mm IS STM Lens Canon EOS 7D Mark II DSLR Camera Kit with 18-135mm IS STM Lens
  • Canon
  • 9128B137AA
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The EOS 7D Mark II uses Dual "DIGIC 6" image processors to deliver a responsive performance. Minimal lag time when shooting means you'll capture fleeting moments with precision timing. Shoot bursts of images at up 10 frames per second, with full autofocus and auto exposureEXPOSUREExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. Achieving the correct exposure is similar to collecting rain in a bucket, up to an optimum level. The rate of rainfall is out of your control (light), yet you can control these three factors: the bucket’s width (lens aperture), the duration you leave it in the rain (shutter speed), and how effective your bucket is in collecting rain (ISO). These three elements work together to control the amount of light per unit area, preventing underexposure (too dark) or overexposure (too bright), giving you a natural looking image.. Responsive handling means you'll capture the split-second moment you are chasing, and a generous bufferBUFFERInternal camera memory used to cue images for saving to the memory card. This cueing is necessary due to the inherent writing speed limit of memory cards. When the buffer becomes full, it creates a bottleneck and the shooting rate reduces dramatically to compensate for the memory card speed limit. More professional cameras typically have much larger buffers which can cue a larger amount of images before the shooting rate is reduced. lets you keep shooting without a drop in performance.

For pin-sharp focus while you shoot, the EOS 7D Mark II has 65 focus points tracking fast moving subjects. Each focus point is a 'cross-type' meaning it can lock on to both horizontal and vertical detail quickly and accurately. To assist shooting in extreme low light conditions 7D Mark II can focus even under moonlight conditions where light levels can be as low as -3EV. Use all 65 AF points together, or group them into moveable zones that cover off-centre subjects. Alternatively, select just a single AF point to focus precisely on a specific part of the scene.

The EOS 7D Mark II's iTR AF focusing system uses colour and face information to recognise and track subjects as they move around the frame. AF responsiveness can be customised using a simple tool which adjusts the focus tracking according to the shooting environment and subject, so that other objects passing momentarily in front of the subject don’t interfere with focusing.

From wildlife to motor sports to street photography, a newly designed 20.2 megapixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. sensor delivers results you'd be proud to see on the wall. Even in poor lighting the EOS 7D Mark II delivers photos and movie clips that are packed with detail.

For consistent, accurate exposureEXPOSUREExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. Achieving the correct exposure is similar to collecting rain in a bucket, up to an optimum level. The rate of rainfall is out of your control (light), yet you can control these three factors: the bucket’s width (lens aperture), the duration you leave it in the rain (shutter speed), and how effective your bucket is in collecting rain (ISO). These three elements work together to control the amount of light per unit area, preventing underexposure (too dark) or overexposure (too bright), giving you a natural looking image. metering the EOS 7D Mark II uses a 150,000-pixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. sensor to split up the scene into 252 areas. Each one is analysed and the correct exposureEXPOSUREExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. Achieving the correct exposure is similar to collecting rain in a bucket, up to an optimum level. The rate of rainfall is out of your control (light), yet you can control these three factors: the bucket’s width (lens aperture), the duration you leave it in the rain (shutter speed), and how effective your bucket is in collecting rain (ISO). These three elements work together to control the amount of light per unit area, preventing underexposure (too dark) or overexposure (too bright), giving you a natural looking image. settings are either set automatically or recommended to the photographer. Infrared light is measured as well as light in the visible part of the spectrum, for greater accuracy in tricky lighting conditions.

When light levels drop, keep shooting without compromising your creativity. The EOS 7D Mark II delivers superb image quality at ISOISOExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. The ISO speed determines how sensitive a camera's sensor is to incoming light. A higher ISO speed absorbs more light, resulting in a brighter exposure, however, a higher ISO also results in more digital noise in low-light conditions. Cameras with larger sensors (like full-frame cameras) typically have higher ISO speed capability and produce less digital noise at high ISO settings. Digital cameras include a control for adjusting ISO speed, some of which can be set to adjust automatically in combination with certain other exposure settings. ISO is indicated in numbers usually starting at 100 and going upward (200, 400, 800, 1600 etc.) doubling in sensitivity each time. Most cameras also indicate 3rd stop intervals (100, 125, 180, 200 etc.) sensitivities up to ISOISOExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. The ISO speed determines how sensitive a camera's sensor is to incoming light. A higher ISO speed absorbs more light, resulting in a brighter exposure, however, a higher ISO also results in more digital noise in low-light conditions. Cameras with larger sensors (like full-frame cameras) typically have higher ISO speed capability and produce less digital noise at high ISO settings. Digital cameras include a control for adjusting ISO speed, some of which can be set to adjust automatically in combination with certain other exposure settings. ISO is indicated in numbers usually starting at 100 and going upward (200, 400, 800, 1600 etc.) doubling in sensitivity each time. Most cameras also indicate 3rd stop intervals (100, 125, 180, 200 etc.) 16,000 (expandable to the equivalent of ISOISOExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. The ISO speed determines how sensitive a camera's sensor is to incoming light. A higher ISO speed absorbs more light, resulting in a brighter exposure, however, a higher ISO also results in more digital noise in low-light conditions. Cameras with larger sensors (like full-frame cameras) typically have higher ISO speed capability and produce less digital noise at high ISO settings. Digital cameras include a control for adjusting ISO speed, some of which can be set to adjust automatically in combination with certain other exposure settings. ISO is indicated in numbers usually starting at 100 and going upward (200, 400, 800, 1600 etc.) doubling in sensitivity each time. Most cameras also indicate 3rd stop intervals (100, 125, 180, 200 etc.) 51,200) – perfect for discreet street photography, freezing the action in difficult conditions, and even hand-held macroMACROProducing photographs that render extreme close-ups of extremely small subjects like insects, hence its popularity among nature photographers. It requires using a macro lens with a large reproduction (magnification) ratio of at least 1:1, which renders a subject larger than life size. Macro lenses are capable of focussing at extremely short distances (some as little as a few centimetres), allowing the photographer to get very close to the subject. photography.

Flickering light, such as that produced by fluorescent light bulbs, can cause inconsistent brightness and colour while shooting. The EOS 7D Mark II can detect such conditions and time each shot to coincide with the peak brightness of the flickering light source, for consistent results.

When weather conditions take a turn for the worse, carry on shooting with confidence. Weather-sealed controls protect the EOS 7D Mark II against water and dust, and magnesium alloy construction adds durability.

The EOS 7D Mark II has a built-in GPS and can geotag images and movie clips with your exact position wherever you are in the world. Record longitude, latitude, elevation and compass direction as well as coordinated universal time.

When shooting in high-contrastCONTRASTThe difference between areas of different brightness levels in a photograph: A high-contrast image has a greater difference between light and dark areas, whereas a low-contrast image has a narrow range of tones. Contrast is used to direct a viewer’s attention to a photographer’s subject either with colour contrast (bold versus duller colours) or tonal contrast (bright versus darker tones). conditions, HDR shooting helps preserve detail in dark shadows and bright highlights. In quick succession the EOS 7D Mark II captures three images at different exposureEXPOSUREExposure is controlled by three elements: Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO. Achieving the correct exposure is similar to collecting rain in a bucket, up to an optimum level. The rate of rainfall is out of your control (light), yet you can control these three factors: the bucket’s width (lens aperture), the duration you leave it in the rain (shutter speed), and how effective your bucket is in collecting rain (ISO). These three elements work together to control the amount of light per unit area, preventing underexposure (too dark) or overexposure (too bright), giving you a natural looking image.s and blends them together for a natural-looking result straight from the camera.

For fast and smooth autofocus tracking whilst shooting movies or when using the Live View, EOS 7D Mark II includes Dual PixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. CMOS AF technology. Each pixelPIXELThe shortening of 'picture element', a basic unit of programmable colour forming the dots that make up an image. Pixel size depends on a camera’s resolution, which is measured in megapixels (MP), meaning millions of pixels. The more pixels on a sensor, the smaller they have to be to fit. An image's number (or density) of pixels correlate to the amount of information and image holds. Cameras with more pixels on the sensor have a higher pixel density and thus more resolving power, able to capture smaller details with much more clarity and accuracy. Higher resolution images can be cropped more agressively and also produce better quality large prints. features two photo diodes that can be read independently during autofocus or together to capture the image. The speed and sensitivity of focus tracking when shooting movies can be adjusted to allow slow pull-focus transitions.

A pure HDMI connection can be used to output Full-HD footage to external recorders, allowing the EOS 7D Mark II to fit seamlessly into professional video-editing workflows. Headphone and microphone sockets let you record a high-quality digital soundtrack, and silent controls allow you change the camera’s settings without producing distracting noiseNOISEThe appearance of random pixels scattered over a photo, similar to the grain effect seen in film photography, which degrades photo quality almost as if it is stained. It occurs when taking photos in low-light conditions, with very slow shutter speeds on high sensitivity (ISO) settings. It is caused by amplification done by the sensor when high ISO settings are used. You can counteract digital noise by lowering the sensitivity (ISO) setting of your camera - the lower the ISO setting, the lower the noise in the image. Typically cameras with larger sensors (like full-frame cameras) will inherently produce less noise due to larger pixels on the sensor..

Camera
Megapixels 20.2 megapixels
Sensor Size Type APS-C
Sensor actual Size 22.4 x 15.0mm
Sensor Type CMOS
Framerate Up to 10fps
ISO Range 100-16 000 (Expandable to 51 200)
Focus Points 65 cross-type AF points (Centre point is an extra sensitive dual-cross-type point at f/2.8, cross-type at f/8 and sensitive to -3EV)
Lens Mount Canon EF-S / EF
Memory CompactFlash Type I (UDMA 7 compatible), SD card, SDHC card or SDXC card. High-speed writing with UHS-I type SD cards is supported
Fastest Shutter Speed 1/8000sec
Longest Shutter Speed 30sec, Bulb mode for longer exposures.
Flash Sync Speed 1/250sec
Processor Dual Digic 6
Video 1920 x 1080 (59.94, 50 fps) inter-frame
1920 x 1080 (29.97, 25, 24, 23.98 fps) intra or inter frame /
1920 x 1080 (29.97, 25) lite inter-frame /
1280 x 720 (59.94, 50 fps) intra or inter frame /
1280 x 720 (29.97, 25, 24, 23.98 fps) lite inter-frame /
640 x 480 (29.97, 25 fps) inter-frame or inter-frame lite
File Formats RAW(CR2), JPEG, MOV (Video: H.264 or MP4: Intra frame / inter frame, Sound: Linear PCM with H.264, AAC with MP4)
Built-in Flash Yes (GN 11 meters at ISO 100)
Weather Sealing Yes
Batteries
Model LP-E6N
mAh 1865mAh
Volt 7.2V
Type Lithium-Ion
Lenses
Focal Length 18-135mm
Maximum Aperture f/3.5-5.6
Minimum Aperture f/22.0-38.0
Barrel Type Plastic
Camera Mount Canon EF-S, Metal Mount
Full Time Manual Focus Yes
Minimum Focus Distance 0.39m
Internal Focus Yes
Internal Zoom No
Image Stabilization Yes
Filter Thread 67mm
Weight 480g

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Tags: 7d mkii, 7d mk2, mark 2

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